Noovella - books, book reviews, joseph raffetto

Noovella.com is the official Web site and blog for the writer Joseph Raffetto.

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I love  The New Yorker on Audible. I don’t have time to read it, but with their audible version I’m able to listen to each issue’s “best articles from The Talk of the Town, Fiction, The Critics, and more” on my walks and when I’m driving. Big fan.

I love The New Yorker on Audible. I don’t have time to read it, but with their audible version I’m able to listen to each issue’s “best articles from The Talk of the Town, Fiction, The Critics, and more” on my walks and when I’m driving. Big fan.

Hatching Twitter: A True Story of Money, Power, Friendship, and Betrayal by Nick Bilton is a fascinating read or audio listen. This inside peak into the creation and eventual success of Twitter is a first class business thriller. I couldn’t stop listening. Speaking of Twitter you can follow me @noovella.

Hatching Twitter: A True Story of Money, Power, Friendship, and Betrayal by Nick Bilton is a fascinating read or audio listen. This inside peak into the creation and eventual success of Twitter is a first class business thriller. I couldn’t stop listening. Speaking of Twitter you can follow me @noovella.

The eighteen best books I read in 2013.
Diaries by George Orwell. Zona by Geoff Dyer. Hatching Twitter by Nick Bilton. The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea by Yukio Mishima. The Road by Cormac McCarthy. The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie by Muriel Spark. The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver. Steve Jobs by Walter Issacson. Chronicles, Vol 1 by Bob Dylan. Just Kids by Patti Smith. Venice: Pure City by Peter Ackroyd. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep by Philip K. Dick. Detroit by Charlie LeDuff. The Fun Stuff by James Woods. Gabriel Garcia Marquez by Gerald Martin. The Art of Living by Epictetus. Jeff in Venice, Death in Vanarasi by Geoff Dyer. Cleopatra: A Life by Stacy Shiff.

The eighteen best books I read in 2013.


Diaries by George Orwell.
Zona by Geoff Dyer.
Hatching Twitter by Nick Bilton.
The Sailor Who Fell from Grace with the Sea by Yukio Mishima.
The Road by Cormac McCarthy.
The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie by Muriel Spark.
The Signal and the Noise by Nate Silver.
Steve Jobs by Walter Issacson.
Chronicles, Vol 1 by Bob Dylan.
Just Kids by Patti Smith.
Venice: Pure City by Peter Ackroyd.
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep by Philip K. Dick.
Detroit by Charlie LeDuff.
The Fun Stuff by James Woods.
Gabriel Garcia Marquez by Gerald Martin.
The Art of Living by Epictetus.
Jeff in Venice, Death in Vanarasi by Geoff Dyer.
Cleopatra: A Life by Stacy Shiff.

The seven best books Bill Gates read in 2013. “More generally, these books tell amazing stories of human ingenuity,” he wrote on GeekWire.
The Box, by Marc Levinson. The Most Powerful Idea in the World, by William Rosen. Harvesting the Biosphere, by Vaclav Smil. The World Until Yesterday, by Jared Diamond. Poor Numbers, by Morten Jerven. Why Does College Cost So Much?, by Robert B. Archibald and David H. Feldman.  The Bet, by Paul Sabin.   High-res

The seven best books Bill Gates read in 2013. “More generally, these books tell amazing stories of human ingenuity,” he wrote on GeekWire.


The Box, by Marc Levinson.
The Most Powerful Idea in the World, by William Rosen.
Harvesting the Biosphere, by Vaclav Smil.
The World Until Yesterday, by Jared Diamond.
Poor Numbers, by Morten Jerven.
Why Does College Cost So Much?, by Robert B. Archibald and David H. Feldman.
The Bet, by Paul Sabin.

The Orwell Prize is Britain’s most prestigious prize for political writing. Every year, we award prizes for the work which comes closest to George Orwell’s ambition ‘to make political writing into an art’.

A new Norman Mailer biography, A Double Life, by J. Michael Lennon. I always thought his essays and nonfiction were amazing. I wasn’t a big fan of his novels, except The Naked and the Dead. It seemed to me he threw the rest of them together as if he wrote them in a weekend. 

A new Norman Mailer biography, A Double Life, by J. Michael Lennon. I always thought his essays and nonfiction were amazing. I wasn’t a big fan of his novels, except The Naked and the Dead. It seemed to me he threw the rest of them together as if he wrote them in a weekend.