Noovella - books, book reviews, joseph raffetto

Noovella.com is the official Web site and blog for the writer Joseph Raffetto.

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If you believe that a novel about three young anthropologists in the 1930s will not be your cup of tea—think again.
Euphoria is a fascinating journey that Lilly King brings to life with a brilliant narrative that captures the passions, desires and intricacies of a blossoming love triangle in the most foreign of lands for a westerner.

If you believe that a novel about three young anthropologists in the 1930s will not be your cup of tea—think again.

Euphoria is a fascinating journey that Lilly King brings to life with a brilliant narrative that captures the passions, desires and intricacies of a blossoming love triangle in the most foreign of lands for a westerner.

The Sailor who Fell from Grace with the Sea by Yukio Michima. The prose is beautiful. A story and characters you will not forget. And it will make you say “Wow” several times.

The Sailor who Fell from Grace with the Sea by Yukio Michima. The prose is beautiful. A story and characters you will not forget. And it will make you say “Wow” several times.

Michael Hastings was a gifted reporter for Newsweek and Rolling Stone, before he tragically died in an automobile accident in Los Angeles in 2013.
They discovered this manuscript on his computer, and fortunately it has been published, and unfortunately it will be his last published piece of fiction.
In my opinion, journalists who attempt to write novels are typically not very good at it. That’s not the case here.
The Last Magazine is compelling, hilarious, nasty, revealing and rollicking ride through the last throes of a big time magazine in the runup and first year of the Iraq War. I’m certain The Last Magazine would have been better if he had time to work with an editor, but it’s bursting with life, and you will not want to put it down.   High-res

Michael Hastings was a gifted reporter for Newsweek and Rolling Stone, before he tragically died in an automobile accident in Los Angeles in 2013.

They discovered this manuscript on his computer, and fortunately it has been published, and unfortunately it will be his last published piece of fiction.

In my opinion, journalists who attempt to write novels are typically not very good at it. That’s not the case here.

The Last Magazine is compelling, hilarious, nasty, revealing and rollicking ride through the last throes of a big time magazine in the runup and first year of the Iraq War. I’m certain The Last Magazine would have been better if he had time to work with an editor, but it’s bursting with life, and you will not want to put it down.

Every Day is for the Thief is an important tale about a young man who returns to Africa after becoming successful in the U.S. We see Nigeria through his intelligent eyes. A well-written novel that you forget is not a memoir.

Every Day is for the Thief is an important tale about a young man who returns to Africa after becoming successful in the U.S. We see Nigeria through his intelligent eyes. A well-written novel that you forget is not a memoir.

I’m a little late jumping on the Haruki Murakami bandwagon. But he’s an extraordinary writer. Murakami’s fiction and talent have no limits. What I find most appealing is the humor and offbeat story lines and voices that are as myriad and creative as Gabriel Garcia Marquez.
I can’t wait for his new book Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage that’s coming out in August 2014.

I’m a little late jumping on the Haruki Murakami bandwagon. But he’s an extraordinary writer. Murakami’s fiction and talent have no limits. What I find most appealing is the humor and offbeat story lines and voices that are as myriad and creative as Gabriel Garcia Marquez.

I can’t wait for his new book Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage that’s coming out in August 2014.

The first paragraph in Love in the Time of Cholera is one of my favorite opening passages in any book.
"It was inevitable: the scent of bitter almonds always reminded him of the fate of unrequited love. Dr. Juvenal Urbino noticed it as soon as he entered the still darkened house where he had hurried on an urgent call to attend a case that for him had lost all urgency many years before. The Antillean refugee Jeremiah de Saint-Amour, disabled war veteran, photographer of children, and his most sympathetic opponent in chess, had escape the torments of memory with the aromatic fumes of gold cyanide."

The first paragraph in Love in the Time of Cholera is one of my favorite opening passages in any book.

"It was inevitable: the scent of bitter almonds always reminded him of the fate of unrequited love. Dr. Juvenal Urbino noticed it as soon as he entered the still darkened house where he had hurried on an urgent call to attend a case that for him had lost all urgency many years before. The Antillean refugee Jeremiah de Saint-Amour, disabled war veteran, photographer of children, and his most sympathetic opponent in chess, had escape the torments of memory with the aromatic fumes of gold cyanide."